Health Care

Health Care

Fighting for Universal Health Care and Full Access to Reproductive Health

Health care is a fundamental human right and we need to do everything we can to get to universal coverage. It’s an embarrassment that here in the United States we still don’t guarantee health care to all our people. Having travelled to many other countries, I’ve seen first-hand how universal coverage is an achievable goal, especially for the wealthiest country in the world. Many examples across the world show that a strong public role in health care can provide affordable, universal coverage. As such, I am proud to support Medicare for All.
 
And I know that health care is about more than insurance. The system is rigged in favor of the big prescription drug companies, who can set whatever prices they want. I would work to make health care – not just health insurance – more affordable, by fighting to bring down out-of-pocket costs for things like co-pays and prescriptions, cracking down on drug companies for their runaway price increases, and holding insurance providers to account.
 
We also need to de-stigmatize mental health and bring mental and behavioral health care on par with physical health care. We need more funding and training for primary care physicians, teachers, and school counselors to identify and support children facing behavioral or mental health challenges, and work with colleges to provide comprehensive mental health services. We need to make sure insurers are complying with mental health parity laws and increase the number of mental health providers around the country – particularly those who accept insurance. We need to ensure that anyone who suffers from substance use disorders gets the treatment and ongoing support that they need, rather than letting them face neglect and stigmatization.
 
I firmly believe in every person’s right to have access to reproductive health services, and I also believe that if we want to support that access, we need more women – and members of the trans and gender non-conforming communities – at the table. We’ve seen what it looks like to have a room full of men legislate on reproductive health, and we’ve seen that women from both sides of the aisle are the ones who, time and again, demand that women’s health considerations be included in more broad health care and budget discussions. We need to ensure that low-income individuals have access to the reproductive health care services that they need by repealing the Hyde Amendment. And we need to codify Roe v. Wade into law so that we never have to worry about creeping state laws that in practice restrict a person’s ability to access their reproductive rights.
 
We also need to focus on the United States’ high – and increasing – maternal mortality rate, especially among Black women, by funding implicit bias training among medical professionals, and extending Medicaid coverage to a full year after pregnancy.