Workplace Equality

Workplace Equality

Building a Workplace that Works for 21st-Century Families

We need to get our workplaces more in line with 21st-century families. That means fighting to end the gender pay gap, which predominately affects African American and Latina women, across all industries. If I am elected to Congress, I will fight for greater salary transparency, including fighting for the full enforcement of Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act, which makes it illegal for employers to prohibit the sharing of salary information, and to pass the Paycheck Fairness Act at the federal level. We also need to do more to compel employers, including government agencies, to intentionally raise wages for roles that are traditionally filled by women.
 
We know that women take on more low-paid or unpaid caregiving roles and are more likely to request time off to support their families, all of which contributes to the gap we see in wages over time. We can help close this gap through government measures like tax credits and better benefits for caregivers. We also know that while wages for the middle class have largely failed to rise, the cost of raising a child has increased dramatically; for many, child care costs each month are roughly equal to the cost of rent or a monthly mortgage. And for many women, lack of affordable child care is a main barrier of entry into the workforce. As a Member of Congress, I will fight to set – and meet – a national goal to keep child care costs within 10 percent of a family’s annual earned income.  To start, we need to invest in better payment assistance programs for families, pre-K for every child, more after-school options, and finally pass paid family leave and create a culture in which people of all genders take that time with their families.